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dc.contributor.authorMueller, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSchile-Beers, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorMozdzer, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.authorChmura, Gail L.
dc.contributor.authorDinter, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorKuzyakov, Yakov
dc.contributor.authorde Groot, Alma V.
dc.contributor.authorEsselink, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSmit, Christian
dc.contributor.authorD'Alpaos, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorIbáñez, Carles
dc.contributor.authorLazarus, Magdalena
dc.contributor.authorNeumeier, Urs
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Beverly J.
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Andrew H.
dc.contributor.authorYarwood, Stephanie A.
dc.contributor.authorMontemayor, Diana I.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Zaichao
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jihua
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Kai
dc.contributor.authorNolte, Stefanie
dc.contributor.otherAgrosistemes i Medi Ambientca
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-02T13:39:06Z
dc.date.available2019-01-02T13:39:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-30
dc.identifier.citationMueller, Peter, Lisa M. Schile-Beers, Thomas J. Mozdzer, Gail L. Chmura, Thomas Dinter, Yakov Kuzyakov, and Alma V. de Groot et al. 2018. "Global-Change Effects On Early-Stage Decomposition Processes In Tidal Wetlands – Implications From A Global Survey Using Standardized Litter". Biogeosciences 15 (10): 3189-3202. Copernicus GmbH. doi:10.5194/bg-15-3189-2018.ca
dc.identifier.issn1726-4170ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/136
dc.description.abstractTidal wetlands, such as tidal marshes and mangroves, are hotspots for carbon sequestration. The preservation of organic matter (OM) is a critical process by which tidal wetlands exert influence over the global carbon cycle and at the same time gain elevation to keep pace with sea-level rise (SLR). The present study assessed the effects of temperature and relative sea level on the decomposition rate and stabilization of OM in tidal wetlands worldwide, utilizing commercially available standardized litter. While effects on decomposition rate per se were minor, we show strong negative effects of temperature and relative sea level on stabilization, as based on the fraction of labile, rapidly hydrolyzable OM that becomes stabilized during deployment. Across study sites, OM stabilization was 29% lower in low, more frequently flooded vs. high, less frequently flooded zones. Stabilization declined by  ∼ 75% over the studied temperature gradient from 10.9 to 28.5°C. Additionally, data from the Plum Island long-term ecological research site in Massachusetts, USA, show a pronounced reduction in OM stabilization by  > 70% in response to simulated coastal eutrophication, confirming the potentially high sensitivity of OM stabilization to global change. We therefore provide evidence that rising temperature, accelerated SLR, and coastal eutrophication may decrease the future capacity of tidal wetlands to sequester carbon by affecting the initial transformations of recent OM inputs to soil OM.ca
dc.format.extent14ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherCopernicus Publicationsca
dc.relation.ispartofBiogeosciencesca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleGlobal-change effects on early-stage decomposition processes in tidal wetlands – implications from a global survey using standardized litterca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versionreprintca
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc639 - Caça. Pesca. Pisciculturaca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3189-2018ca
dc.contributor.groupAigües Marines i Continentalsca


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