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dc.contributor.authorAraus, José L.
dc.contributor.authorSerret, Maria D.
dc.contributor.authorLopes, Marta S.
dc.contributor.otherProducció Vegetalca
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-17T13:02:35Z
dc.date.available2019-06-17T13:02:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-11
dc.identifier.citationAraus, José L, Maria D Serret, and Marta S Lopes. 2019. "Transgenic Solutions To Increase Yield And Stability In Wheat: Shining Hope Or Flash In The Pan?". Journal Of Experimental Botany 70 (5): 1419-1424. Oxford University Press (OUP). doi:10.1093/jxb/erz077.ca
dc.identifier.issn0022-0957ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/447
dc.description.abstractSecond-generation transgenic crops have the potential to transform agriculture, but progress has been limited, and particularly so in wheat where no transgenic cultivar has yet been approved. Taking on the challenge, González et al. (2019) report that transgenic wheat lines carrying a mutated version of the sunflower transcription factor (HaHB4), belonging to the homeodomain-leucine zipper family (HD-Zip I), had increased yield and water use efficiency across a range of environments, with particular benefits under stress. It is an important step forward in an area where progress is urgently needed, though it is too early to claim that transgenic wheat will form the backbone of a second Green Revolution. To meet the growing demand for food, together with the challenges imposed by climate change, substantial improvements in yields of major crops are needed. This includes wheat, where globally the multi-year tendency for growth in yield is decreasing (Passioura, 2012) or even stagnating (Driever et al., 2017). Current and expected future relative rates of progress in yield potential and drought adaptation in wheat are a matter of real concern, and insufficient to meet the projected demand for cereals by 2050 (Hall and Richards, 2013). There are three major challenges: increasing yield potential, protecting yield potential from different types of stress, and increasing resource use efficiency to ensure sustainability (Hawkesford et al., 2013).ca
dc.format.extent6ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherOxford University Pressca
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Botanyca
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.titleTransgenic solutions to increase yield and stability in wheat: shining hope or flash in the pan?ca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc63ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erz077ca
dc.contributor.groupCultius Extensius Sosteniblesca


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