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dc.contributor.authorNapp, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorChevalier, Veronique
dc.contributor.authorBusquets, Núria
dc.contributor.authorCalistri, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorCasal, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorAttia, Mohamed
dc.contributor.authorElbassal, Rehab
dc.contributor.authorHosni, Heba
dc.contributor.authorFarrag, Hatem
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Noura
dc.contributor.authorTawfik, Rasha
dc.contributor.authorAbd Elkader, Sohair
dc.contributor.authorBayomy, Shahin
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-04T13:17:10Z
dc.date.available2018-12-04T13:17:10Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-19
dc.identifier.citationNapp, Sebastian, Veronique Chevalier, Núria Busquets, Paolo Calistri, Jordi Casal, Mohamed Attia, and Rehab Elbassal et al. 2018. "Understanding The Legal Trade Of Cattle And Camels And The Derived Risk Of Rift Valley Fever Introduction Into And Transmission Within Egypt". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 12 (1): e0006143. Public Library of Science (PLoS). doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006143.ca
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/102
dc.description.abstractRift Valley Fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonosis, which may cause significant losses for the livestock sector and have serious public health implications. Egypt has been repeatedly affected by RVF epidemics, mainly associated to the importation of animals from sub-Saharan countries, where the disease is endemic. The objective of our study was the improvement of the surveillance and control strategies implemented in Egypt. In order to do that, first we evaluated the legal trade of live animals into and within Egypt. Then, we assessed the risk of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) transmission within the country using a multi-criteria evaluation approach. Finally, we combined the animal trade and the risk of RVFV transmission data to identify those areas and periods in which the introduction of RVFV is more likely. Our results indicate that the main risk of RVFV introduction is posed by the continuous flow of large number of camels coming from Sudan. The risk of RVFV transmission by vectors is restricted to the areas surrounding the Nile river, and does not vary significantly throughout the year. Imported camels are taken to quarantines, where the risk of RVFV transmission by vectors is generally low. Then, they are taken to animal markets or slaughterhouses, many located in populated areas, where the risk of RVFV transmission to animals or humans is much higher. The measures currently implemented (quarantines, vaccination or testing) seem to have a limited effect in reducing the risk of RVFV introduction, and therefore other (risk-based) surveillance strategies are proposed.ca
dc.format.extent25ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceca
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleUnderstanding the legal trade of cattle and camels and the derived risk of Rift Valley Fever introduction into and transmission within Egyptca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.relation.projectIDEC/FP7/613996/EU/Emerging viral vector borne diseases/VMERGEca
dc.subject.udc619 - Veterinàriaca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006143ca
dc.contributor.groupSanitat Animalca


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/