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dc.contributor.authorMartínez-García, Pedro José
dc.contributor.authorHartung, Jens
dc.contributor.authorPérez de los Cobos, Felipe
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-García, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorJalili, Sara
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Roldán, Juan Manuel
dc.contributor.authorRubio, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorDicenta, Federico
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Gómez, Pedro
dc.contributor.otherProducció Vegetalca
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-27T14:13:12Z
dc.date.available2021-01-27T14:13:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-14
dc.identifier.citationMartínez-García, Pedro José, Jens Hartung, Felipe Pérez de los Cobos, Pablo Martínez-García, Sara Jalili, Juan Manuel Sánchez-Roldán, Manuel Rubio, Federico Dicenta, and Pedro Martínez-Gómez. 2020. "Temporal Response To Drought Stress In Several Prunus Rootstocks And Wild Species". Agronomy 10 (9): 1383. doi:10.3390/agronomy10091383.ca
dc.identifier.issn2073-4395ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1060
dc.description.abstractPrunus species are important crops in temperate regions. In these regions, drought periods are predicted to occur more frequently due to climate change. In this sense, to reduce the impact of climate warming, obtaining new tolerant/resistant cultivars and rootstocks is a mandatory goal in Prunus breeding. Therefore, the current study assembled three Prunus species including almond, (P. dulcis Mill D.A. Webb), apricot (P. armeniaca L.) and peach (P. persica L.) to model the temporal effects of drought. A hybrid peach × almond and a wild almond-relative species Prunus webbii were also included in the study. Physiological traits associated with photosynthetic activity, leaf water status, and chlorophyll content were assessed under three watering treatments. Results showed that effects of time, genotype, and treatment interact significantly in all traits. In addition, results confirmed that P. webbii have a greater tolerance to drought than commercial rootstocks. However, “Real Fino” apricot showed the fastest recovery after re-irrigation while being one of the most affected cultivars. In addition, from the better response to these watering treatments by the almond genotypes, two different trends were observed after re-irrigation treatment that clearly differentiate the response of the almond cultivar “Garrigue” from the rest of Prunus genotypes. A better characterization of the short-term drought response in Prunus, an accurate and more efficient evaluation of the genotype effect was obtained from the use of mixed models considering appropriate variance–covariance structures. Although the advantages of these approaches are rarely used in Prunus breeding, these methodologies should be undertaken in the future by breeders to increase efficiency in developing new breeding materials.ca
dc.format.extent18ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherMDPIca
dc.relation.ispartofAgronomyca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleTemporal response to drought stress in several Prunus rootstocks and wild speciesca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.relation.projectIDEC/FP7/ /EU/Selection and characterization of drought resistant almond cultivars from the Mediterranean basin with high nutraceutical values/Nut4Droughtca
dc.relation.projectIDEC/FP7/618127/EU/Coordination of the Agricultural Research in the Mediterranean/ARIMNET2ca
dc.subject.udc63ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091383ca
dc.contributor.groupFructiculturaca


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