Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorReig, Gemma
dc.contributor.authorLordan, Jaume
dc.contributor.authorHoying, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorFargione, Michael
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorFrancescatto, Poliana
dc.contributor.authorAcimovic, Dana
dc.contributor.authorFazio, Gennaro
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Terence
dc.contributor.otherProducció Vegetalca
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T14:53:18Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T14:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-21
dc.identifier.citationReig, Gemma, Jaume Lordan, Stephen Hoying, Michael Fargione, Daniel J. Donahue, Poliana Francescatto, Dana Acimovic, Gennaro Fazio, and Terence Robinson. 2020. "Long-Term Performance Of ‘Delicious’ Apple Trees Grafted On Geneva® Rootstocks And Trained To Four High-Density Systems Under New York State Climatic Conditions". Hortscience 55 (10): 1538-1550. doi:10.21273/hortsci14904-20.ca
dc.identifier.issn0003-1062ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1113
dc.description.abstractWe conducted a large (0.8 ha) field experiment of system × rootstock, using Super Chief Delicious apple as cultivar at Yonder farm in Hudson, NY, between 2007 and 2017. In this study, we compared six Geneva® rootstocks (‘G.11’, ‘G.16’, ‘G.210’, ‘G.30’, ‘G.41’, and ‘G.935’) with one Budagovsky (‘B.118’) and three Malling rootstocks (‘M.7EMLA’, ‘M.9T337’ and ‘M.26EMLA’). Trees on each rootstock were trained to four high-density systems: Super Spindle (SS) (5382 apple trees/ha), Tall Spindle (TS) (3262 apple trees/ha), Triple Axis Spindle (TAS) (2243 apple trees/ha), and Vertical Axis (VA) (1656 apple trees/ha). Rootstock and training system interacted to influence growth, production, and fruit quality. When comparing systems, SS trees were the least vigorous but much more productive on a per hectare basis. Among the rootstocks we evaluated, ‘B.118’ had the largest trunk cross-sectional area (TCSA), followed by ‘G.30’ and ‘M.7EMLA’, which were similar in size but they did not differ statistically from ‘G.935’. ‘M.9T337’ was the smallest and was significantly smaller than most of the other rootstocks but it did not differ statistically from ‘G.11’, ‘G.16’, ‘G.210’, ‘G.41’, and ‘M.26EMLA’. Although ‘B.118’ trees were the largest, they had low productivity, whereas the second largest rootstock ‘G.30’ was the most productive on a per hectare basis. ‘M.9’ was the smallest rootstock and failed to adequately fill the space in all systems except the SS, and had low cumulative yield. The highest values for cumulative yield efficiency (CYE) were with ‘G.210’ for all training systems except for VA, where ‘M.9T337’ had the highest value. The lowest values were for all training systems with ‘B.118’ and ‘M.7EMLA’. Regardless of the training system, ‘M.7EMLA’ trees had the highest number of root suckers. Some fruit quality traits were affected by training system, rootstock or system × rootstock combination.ca
dc.format.extent13ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Horticultural Scienceca
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Society for Horticultural Scienceca
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleLong-term Performance of ‘Delicious’ Apple Trees Grafted on Geneva® Rootstocks and Trained to Four High-density Systems under New York State Climatic Conditionsca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc63ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.21273/HORTSCI14904-20ca
dc.contributor.groupFructiculturaca


Files in this item

 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/