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dc.contributor.authorGittins, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorGrau-Roma, Llorenç
dc.contributor.authorValle, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorAbad, Francesc Xavier
dc.contributor.authorNofrarías, Miquel
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Peter G.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Solís, Jacob
dc.contributor.authorMajó, Natàlia
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-25T08:49:05Z
dc.date.available2021-02-25T08:49:05Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-03
dc.identifier.citationGittins, Oliver, Llorenç Grau-Roma, Rosa Valle, Francesc Xavier Abad, Miquel Nofrarías, Peter G. Ryan, Jacob González-Solís, and Natàlia Majó. 2020. "Serological And Molecular Surveys Of Influenza A Viruses In Antarctic And Sub-Antarctic Wild Birds". Antarctic Science 32 (1): 15-20. doi:10.1017/s0954102019000464.ca
dc.identifier.issn0954-1020ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1154
dc.description.abstractTo evaluate how avian influenza virus (AIV) circulates among the avifauna of the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic islands, we surveyed 14 species of birds from Marion, Livingston and Gough islands. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was carried out on the sera of 147 birds. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the AIV genome from 113 oropharyngeal and 122 cloacal swabs from these birds. The overall seroprevalence to AIV infection was 4.8%, with the only positive results coming from brown skuas (Catharacta antarctica) (4 out of 18, 22%) and southern giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus) (3 out of 24, 13%). Avian influenza virus antibodies were detected in birds sampled from Marion and Gough islands, with a higher seroprevalence on Marion Island (P = 0.014) and a risk ratio of 11.29 (95% confidence interval: 1.40–91.28) compared to Gough Island. The AIV genome was not detected in any of the birds sampled. These results confirm that AIV strains are uncommon among Antarctic and sub-Antarctic predatory seabirds, but they may suggest that scavenging seabirds are the main avian reservoirs and spreaders of this virus in the Southern Ocean. Further studies are necessary to determine the precise role of these species in the epidemiology of AIV.ca
dc.format.extent12ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressca
dc.relation.ispartofAntarctic Scienceca
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleSerological and molecular surveys of influenza A viruses in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic wild birdsca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.terms6 mesosca
dc.relation.projectIDMINECO/Programa Nacional de Proyectos de Investigación Fundamental/CGL2009-11278-BOS/ES/Ecología pelágica y estrategias migratorias de las aves marinas en el Atlántico/ca
dc.relation.projectIDMICINN/Programa Nacional de Proyectos de Investigación Fundamental/CTM2011-12973-E/ES/PUBLICACION DE UN VOLUMEN ESPECIAL SOBRE LA PENINSULA BYERS COMO CONSECUENCIA DEL AÑO POLAR INTERNACIONAL/ca
dc.subject.udc619ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0954102019000464ca
dc.contributor.groupSanitat Animalca


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