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dc.contributor.authorEspunyes, Johan
dc.contributor.authorCabezón, Oscar
dc.contributor.authorDias-Alves, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorMiralles, Pol
dc.contributor.authorAyats, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorCerdà-Cuéllar, Marta
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-15T15:03:19Z
dc.date.available2021-03-15T15:03:19Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-15
dc.identifier.citationEspunyes, Johan, Oscar Cabezón, Andrea Dias-Alves, Pol Miralles, Teresa Ayats, and Marta Cerdà-Cuéllar. 2021. "Assessing The Role Of Livestock And Sympatric Wild Ruminants In Spreading Antimicrobial Resistant Campylobacter And Salmonella In Alpine Ecosystems". BMC Veterinary Research 17 (1). doi:10.1186/s12917-021-02784-2.ca
dc.identifier.issn1746-6148ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1193
dc.description.abstractBackground: Livestock play an important role as reservoir of enteric pathogens and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), a health and economic concern worldwide. However, little is known regarding the transmission and maintenance of these pathogens at the wildlife-livestock interface. In this study, we assessed the occurrence, genetic diversity and AMR of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. shed by sympatric free-ranging livestock and a wild herbivore in an alpine ecosystem. Results: Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 23.3 % of cattle and 7.7 % of sheep but was not isolated from horses nor Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica). Campylobacter jejuni was the most frequent species. A high genetic diversity and certain host specificity of C. jejuni isolates was observed. The main AMR detected in Campylobacter isolates was to nalidixic acid (88.2 %), ciprofloxacin (82.4 %) and tetracycline (82.4 %); only 11.7 % of the isolates were pan-susceptible and 17.6 % were multi-resistant. Salmonella ser. Newport was isolated only from one Pyrenean chamois and was pan-susceptible. Conclusions: Results show that free-ranging cattle and sheep are spreaders of Campylobacter as well as their AMR strains in the alpine environment. Therefore, contaminated alpine pastures or streams may constitute a source for the dissemination of AMR enteropathogens. However, apparently, alpine wild ungulates such as Pyrenean chamois play a negligible role in the epidemiology of zoonotic enteropathogens and AMR, and are not potential bioindicators of the burden of alpine environments.ca
dc.format.extent8ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherBMCca
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Veterinary Researchca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleAssessing the role of livestock and sympatric wild ruminants in spreading antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter and Salmonella in alpine ecosystemsca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc619ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-021-02784-2ca
dc.contributor.groupSanitat Animalca


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