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dc.contributor.authorRamos-Júdez, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-López, Wendy Ángela
dc.contributor.authorHuayanay Ostos, Jhons
dc.contributor.authorCosta Mamani, Noemí
dc.contributor.authorMarrero Alemán, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorBeirão, José
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Neil
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-15T15:23:57Z
dc.date.available2021-03-15T15:23:57Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-10
dc.identifier.citationRamos-Júdez, Sandra, Wendy Ángela González-López, Jhons Huayanay Ostos, Noemí Cota Mamani, Carlos Marrero Alemán, José Beirão, and Neil Duncan. 2021. "Low sperm to egg ratio required for successful in vitro fertilization in a pair-spawning teleost, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis)". Royal Society Open Science. doi:10.1098/rsos.201718.ca
dc.identifier.issn2054-5703ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1194
dc.description.abstractCultured Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) breeders fail to spawn fertilized eggs. The implantation of large-scale in vitro fertilization protocols, to solve this problem, has been frustrated by low production of poor quality sperm. Cultured females were induced to ovulate with a 5 µg kg−1 single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) and viable eggs (82.6 ± 9.2% fertilization) were stripped 41:57 ± 1:46 h after the injection. Sperm was collected from cultured males, diluted in modified Leibovitz and used fresh to fertilize the eggs. Males were not treated with hormones. A nonlinear regression, an exponential rise to a maximum (R = 0.93, p < 0.0001) described the number of motile spermatozoa required to fertilize a viable egg and 1617 motile spermatozoa were sufficient to fertilize 99 ± 12% (±95% CI) of viable eggs. Similar, spermatozoa egg−1 ratios of 592 ± 611 motile spermatozoa egg−1 were used in large-scale in vitro fertilizations (190 512 ± 38 471 eggs). The sperm from a single male (145 ± 50 µl or 8.0 ± 6.8 × 108 spermatozoa) was used to fertilize the eggs. The mean hatching rate was 70 ± 14% to provide 131 540 ± 34 448 larvae per fertilization. The viability of unfertilized eggs stored at room temperature decreased gradually, and the sooner eggs were fertilized after stripping, the higher the viability of the eggs. The collection of sperm directly into a syringe containing modified Leibovitz significantly increased the percentage of motile spermatozoa (33.4 ± 12.2%) compared with other collection methods. The spz egg−1 ratios for Senegalese sole were at the lower end of ratios required for fish. Senegalese sole have a pair-spawning reproductive behaviour characterized by gamete fertilization in close proximity with no sperm competition. The provision of a large-scale in vitro fertilization protocol (200 µl of sperm per 100 ml of eggs) will enable the industry to operate sustainably and implement breeding programmes to improve production.ca
dc.format.extent15ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyca
dc.relation.ispartofRoyal Society Open Scienceca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleLow sperm to egg ratio required for successful in vitro fertilization in a pair-spawning teleost, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis)ca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.relation.projectIDINIA-FEDER/Programa Estatal de I+D+I orientada a los retos de la sociedad/RTA2014-00048-00-00/ES/Gestión de los reproductores basada en su comportamiento para aumentar la producción de gametos y el éxito reproductivo en el lenguado senegalés (Solea senegalensis) cultivado (F1) y salvaje/ca
dc.subject.udc639ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.201718ca
dc.contributor.groupAqüiculturaca


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