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dc.contributor.authorMarin, C.
dc.contributor.authorCerdà-Cuéllar, M.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Bodi, S.
dc.contributor.authorLorenzo-Rebenaque, L.
dc.contributor.authorVega, S.
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-09T10:03:24Z
dc.date.available2022-08-09T10:03:24Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-21
dc.identifier.citationMarin, C., M. Cerdà-Cuéllar, S. González-Bodi, L. Lorenzo-Rebenaque, and S. Vega. 2022. "Research Note: Persistent Salmonella Problems In Slaughterhouses Related To Clones Linked To Poultry Companies". Poultry Science 101 (8): 101968. doi:10.1016/j.psj.2022.101968.ca
dc.identifier.issn0032-5791ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/1873
dc.description.abstractSalmonellosis remains one of the main foodborne zoonoses in Europe, with poultry products as the main source of human infections. The slaughterhouse has been identified as a potential source for Salmonella contamination of poultry meat. Despite the mandatory programme of the EU, there are companies with persistent Salmonella that are unable to remove the bacteria from their processing environment, compromising the entire production line. In this context, an intensive sampling study was conducted to investigate a slaughterhouse with persistent Salmonella problems, establishing the genetic relationship among Salmonella strains isolated during the slaughter process. A total of 36 broiler flocks were sampled during processing at the slaughterhouse. Salmonella was identified based on ISO 6579-1:2017 (Annex D), serotyped by Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique, and the genetic relationship was assessed with ERIC-PCR followed by PFGE. The outcomes showed that 69.4% of the batches sampled carried Salmonella upon arrival at the slaughterhouse and that 46.3% of the different samples from carcasses were contaminated with Salmonella. The two serovars isolated at the different steps in the slaughterhouse were Enteritidis (98.2%) and Kentucky (1.8%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed a low genetic diversity, with all S. Enteritidis isolates showing a nearly identical pulsotype (similarity >85%) and S. Kentucky strains showed the same XbaI PFGE profile (95.0% genetic similarity). The results of this study showed a high genetic relationship among isolates recovered from carcasses and environmental samples in the slaughterhouse from both Salmonella-positive and Salmonella-free flocks. Salmonella strains re-circulated across to poultry flocks and re-entered the slaughterhouse to survive on the processing line. Thus, it is necessary to implement molecular diagnosis methods in time at the field level to determine the Salmonella epidemiology of the flock, to make rapid decisions for the control of Salmonella and prevent entry into the slaughterhouse environment.ca
dc.format.extent6ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherElsevierca
dc.relation.ispartofPoultry Scienceca
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleResearch Note: Persistent Salmonella problems in slaughterhouses related to clones linked to poultry companiesca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.subject.udc619ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2022.101968ca
dc.contributor.groupSanitat Animalca


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