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dc.contributor.authorBirnberg, Lotty
dc.contributor.authorAranda, Carles
dc.contributor.authorTalavera, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorNúñez, Ana I.
dc.contributor.authorEscosa, Raúl
dc.contributor.authorBusquets, Núria
dc.contributor.otherProducció Animalca
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-03T12:53:45Z
dc.date.available2020-11-03T12:53:45Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-03
dc.identifier.citationBirnberg, Lotty, Carles Aranda, Sandra Talavera, Ana I. Núñez, Raúl Escosa, and Núria Busquets. 2020. "Laboratory Colonization And Maintenance Of Anopheles Atroparvus From The Ebro Delta, Spain". Parasites & Vectors 13 (1). doi:10.1186/s13071-020-04268-y.ca
dc.identifier.issn1756-3305ca
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12327/964
dc.description.abstractBackground: Historically, Anopheles atroparvus has been considered one of the most important malaria vectors in Europe. Since malaria was eradicated from the European continent, the interest in studying its vectors reduced signifcantly. Currently, to better assess the potential risk of malaria resurgence on the continent, there is a growing need to update the data on susceptibility of indigenous Anopheles populations to imported Plasmodium species. In order to do this, as a frst step, an adequate laboratory colony of An. atroparvus is needed. Methods: Anopheles atroparvus mosquitoes were captured in rice felds from the Ebro Delta (Spain). Field-caught specimens were maintained in the laboratory under simulated feld-summer conditions. Adult females were artifcially blood-fed on fresh whole rabbit blood for oviposition. First- to fourth-instar larvae were fed on pulverized fsh and turtle food. Adults were maintained with a 10% sucrose solution ad libitum. Results: An An. atroparvus population from the Ebro Delta was successfully established in the laboratory. During the colonization process, feeding and hatching rates increased, while a reduction in larval mortality rate was observed. Conclusions: The present study provides a detailed rearing and maintenance protocol for An. atroparvus and a publicly available reference mosquito strain within the INFRAVEC2 project for further research studies involving vectorparasite interactions. Keywords: Anopheles atroparvus, Colonization, Malaria, Europeca
dc.format.extent5ca
dc.language.isoengca
dc.publisherBMCca
dc.relation.ispartofParasites and Vectorsca
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalca
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleLaboratory colonization and maintenance of Anopheles atroparvus from the Ebro Delta, Spainca
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca
dc.rights.accessLevelinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.embargo.termscapca
dc.relation.projectIDEC/H2020/731060/EU/Research Infrastructures for the control of vector-borne diseases/INFRAVEC2ca
dc.subject.udc619ca
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-020-04268-yca
dc.contributor.groupSanitat Animalca


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/